Thursday, February 6, 2014

Memorial of St. Paul Miki and Companions

I was always fascinated by the Asian martyrs, specifically in China and Japan since those were the ones I usually could find info about. After becoming more interested in Takashi Nagai (here and here), I have even more of an attachment to St. Paul Miki and his companions since they formed the foundation of the Christian community that Nagai was part of.

This is an opportunity not only to share more about these brave martyrs, but also to highlight my favorite book about saints, bar none, Voices of the Saints by Bert Ghezzi. He includes a saint for every day of the year and each is as well written about as you can see in the excerpt below, often with copious quotes from the saints' own writing so you get a real feel for the person. (I picked up the text from Ignatian Spirituality which is a good resource for all sorts of things. At the very least, I appreciate not having to type all this in! The picture is my addition, Ghezzi's book has no images in it.)

St. Paul Miki, SJ ((1564? - 1597)

Christianity spread like wildfire in sixteenth-century Japan. By the 1580s, less than forty years after Francis Xavier introduced the faith, the church counted two hundred thousand converts. The growth had proceeded despite the opposition of Buddhist priests and many petty rulers. However, in 1587, Emperor Hideyoshi ordered the banishment of all Catholics, forcing the Jesuit missionaries to operate from hiding. But outright persecution did not break out until late 1596, when Hideyoshi rounded up twenty-six Jesuits, Franciscans, and laypeople and prepared to martyr them.

Among the victims was St. Paul Miki, a Jesuit novice who had just completed eleven years of training. Paul’s noble family was converted when he was a child and at age five he was baptized. Educated by Jesuits, the gifted youth joined their novitiate at age twenty-two. He had studied intensively the teachings of the Buddhists so as to be able to debate their priests. He welcomed his chance at martyrdom, but may have wished just a little that it would be delayed long enough for him to be ordained a priest.

Hideyoshi had the left ears of the twenty-six martyrs severed as a sign of disrespect and paraded them through Kyoto. Dressed in his simple black cassock, Paul stood out among them. Most onlookers realized that this noble young man could have worn the samurai’s costume with two swords on his belt. The whole display had the unexpected effect of evoking compassion from the crowd, some of whom later became converts.

The martyrs were then taken to Nagasaki. They were tied to crosses with their necks held in place by iron rings. Beside each was an executioner with his spear ready to strike. An eyewitness gave this account:
When the crosses were set up it was a wonderful thing to see the constancy of all of them. Our brother Paul Miki, seeing himself raised to the most honorable position that he had ever occupied, openly proclaimed that he was a Japanese and a member of the Society of Jesus. And that he was being put to death for having preached the gospel. He gave thanks to God for such a precious favor.

He then added these words: “Having arrived at this moment of my existence, I believe that no one of you thinks I want to hide the truth. That is why I declare to you that there is no other way of salvation than the one followed by Christians. Since this way teaches me to forgive my enemies and all who have offended me, I willingly forgive the king and all those who have desired my death. And I pray that they will obtain the desire of Christian baptism.”

At this point, he turned his eyes toward his companions and began to encourage them in their final struggle. The faces of them all shone with great gladness. Another Christian shouted to him that he would soon be in paradise. “Like my Master,” murmured Paul, “I shall die upon the cross. Like him, a lance will pierce my heart so that my blood and my love can flow out upon the land and sanctify it to his name.”
As they awaited death the entire group sang the canticle of Zachary (see Luke 1:67–79). The executioners stood by respectfully until they had intoned the last verse. Then at a given signal they thrust their spears into the victims’ sides. On that day, February 5, 1597, the church of Japan welcomed its first martyrs.
Bert Ghezzi, Voices of the Saints
This is the Church's prayer for today. I love the collects and the way they give us pointers, if we reflect on them, on how to live a devout life. It's like a tiny catechism in a prayer. I picked this up from Catholic Culture which is another excellent resource.
Collect: O God, strength of all the Saints, who through the Cross were pleased to call the Martyrs Saint Paul Miki and companions to life, grant, we pray, that by their intercession we may hold with courage even until death to the faith that we profess. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.


  1. I preached on this memorial today.

  2. Oh my. I had no idea. I knew of the persecutions in Japan, mostly from the novel by Endo, Silence, but I had not heard of these martyrs. Thanks for the post Julie. May our faith be as strong as St Paul Mikki's and of his companions.